A Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
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Minoru Yamasaki: Humanist Architecture for a Modernist World

  • Wednesday, October 10, 2018
  • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
  • The Ann Arbor District Library Downtown
  • 23

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The Ann Arbor District Library is hosting a lecture entitled, "Minoru Yamasaki:  Humanist Architecture for a Modernist World", by Dale Gyure of Laurence Technological University on Wednesday October 10th at 7 PM. 

Minoru Yamasaki (1912-1986) was one of the world’s best known architects in the early 1960's.  His popularity arose from a unique form of humanist architecture developed in the fifties which melded his interest in invoking feelings of “serenity,” “surprise,” and “delight” with insights gained from studying historical architecture in Europe, India, and Japan. 

Yamasaki sought to provide pleasant environments for users and employed decorative forms, water features, and gentle historical references in a way that distanced his work from the obsession with function or structure which characterized much of contemporary architecture. His designs pleased both critics and the public, spawning numerous imitators. In the mid-sixties negative criticism of the World Trade Center project marked an abrupt shift in his reputation in the architectural world, and with the rise of postmodern architectural theories and a new generation of architects condemning the failed utopian visions of their predecessors, Yamasaki seemed old-fashioned with his emphasis on outmoded concepts like beauty. But his work never lost its appeal to the everyday public. Today scholars are reassessing Yamasaki as a representative of one of many fascinating expressions assumed by modern architecture in the twentieth century.

Location: Ann Arbor District Library, Downtown

Parking: In nearby parking garages or on-street metered parking

Continuing Education: This tour will be accredited for 1.25 LU continuing education credit. Course No. AIAHVCE0106

Learning Objectives

1: Describe the basic trajectory and key designs of Minoru Yamasaki’s career.

 2: Understand the various connotations of “humanism” in mid-twentieth century modern architectural discourse.

3: Understand Yamasaki’s design principles of “serenity, surprise, and delight.”

4: Explain the importance of humanism in the history of architecture. 

  • This is a public lecture.  Please register with the AIA for LU credit and check in with the AIA HV rep that night to confirm attendance. 

Questions? Contact: Theresa Angelini, tangelini@angeliniarchitects.com

Please register ASAP!

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